Primary and Secondary Sources

When looking at the primary sources for my project I can see how they are connected to the secondary sources and also how the secondary sources may not always utilize every aspect of the primary sources. Each secondary source takes certain aspects of primary sources to argue their points. The primary sources offer a wide range of reasons why Fonda was singled out as a traitor. These reasons range from gender, to film, and to culture. The problem with many of these primary sources is that many are opinions of what happened and even Fonda’s own account of her trip to Hanoi may be somewhat biased. This is also influenced the secondary sources because they do not look at all the aspects of why Fonda was a traitor, they just chose one to look at. Looking at the primary sources and secondary sources together has helped me to focus my own research to expand the literature. By looking at everything that could have caused these emtions to happen, then the Hanoi myth may be able to have an origin.

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2 Responses to “Primary and Secondary Sources”

  1. jsong2 says:

    When you run into problems like how secondary sources you have do not utilized your primary sources, look at your topic in a broader view. It might help you to find a different sources that will somehow related to your primnary sources. when looking for secondary source, don’t just focus on what you are writing about, but more into broader scale. You never know what you will find:)

  2. Jessica Reingold says:

    You say “The problem with many of these primary sources is that many are opinions of what happened and even Fonda’s own account of her trip to Hanoi may be somewhat biased. ” I’m not sure, but maybe you could find a news media source that a has record of being less bias…or maybe if you could find a news report from another country about it, one that has no involvement with Vietnam, they could provide a different perspective.